Scripps research advances stem cell work

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute announced Tuesday they found new compounds that can be used to re-program adult cells into pluripotent stem cells, which can then be developed into any cell type.

The compounds BIX and BayK, when used together, effectively re-program the cells, according to a study published in the journal “Cell Stem Cell.”

BIX inhibits enzymes involved in regulating gene expression. BayK activates receptors for calcium. Together, they can replace the SOX2 gene, which plays a critical role in regulating embryonic stem cells, according to Sheng Ding of TSRI

The use of embryonic stem cells in medical research has been a controversial political issue and has led scientists to find ways to use plentiful general cells, called fibroblasts, for the same purposes.

The study “leads us one step closer to the ultimate reprogramming of general cells to pluripotent cells in a completely chemically defined manner without genetic manipulation,” Ding said. “In conjunction with our earlier published studies, it offers definitive proof that we can make cell reprogramming technology much more practical than it has been.”

The approach used to discover the effective compounds could lead to others that also work and, eventually, new therapies for illnesses, he said.

Since BayK cannot work alone, needing BIX, cells already in the process of being re-programmed because of injury or some other reason might be more susceptible to it, the scientist said.

“Needless to say, more work needs to be done to understand the precise mechanism by which BayK affects the reprogramming process,” Ding said.

BayK is the first molecule of its type to be effective in reprogramming, he said.

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine i Munster, Germany, contributed to the study.

Related posts:

  1. Research Roundup: Basic research gets financial boost from major grants
  2. UCSD researcher receives $1.5 million award
  3. Research Roundup: Vitamin D may help prevent skin infections
  4. Renowned Del Mar researcher passes
  5. Local Nobel laureate dies

Short URL: http://www.delmartimes.net/?p=6539

Posted by Pat Sherman on Nov 5, 2008. Filed under Archives. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

Leave a Reply

Archives

Facebook

Bottom Buttons 1

Bottom Buttons 2

Bottom Buttons 3

Bottom Buttons 4

Bottom Buttons 5

Bottom Buttons 6

LA JOLLA NEWS

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

RSS RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

  • RSF Association Board Biz: It’s fire season: Be prepared
    The Rancho Santa Fe Fire Protection District (RSFFPD) was officially formed in 1946, in the aftermath of a devastating fire that took place in 1943 and destroyed brush, farmland and homes from Rancho Bernardo through Rancho Santa Fe, all the way to Solana Beach and Del Mar. Today the Fire District spans 38 square miles and protects nearly 30,000 residents. W […]
  • Rancho Santa Fe couple lead way in helping those with thyroid disorders
    Few people may know that Graves’ disease is one of the most common autoimmune diseases afflicting Americans today. Fewer still may know that the only national non-profit dedicated to its patients is headquartered in Rancho Santa Fe. The Graves’ Disease and Thyroid Foundation, co-chaired by Rancho Santa Fe residents Kathleen Bell Flynn and Steve Flynn, has be […]
  • Candidates seek election to three Rancho Santa Fe special district boards
    Seats on the boards of directors of three special districts that provide such services as water, fire protection, sewage treatment and landscape maintenance are on the ballot in the Nov. 4 election. The three special districts are the Santa Fe Irrigation District, the Rancho Santa Fe Fire Protection District and the Rancho Santa Fe Community Services Distric […]