Our View: Helpful suggestions in preparing for fire season

Editor’s note: As fire season approaches, it’s never too soon to start preparing your home and property. Below are the California Landscape Contractors Association’s recommendations for landscaping with fire prevention as a priority.

Homes in California have been built in natural fire zones. Coupled with predicted climate change, many areas of California and our country are expected to get hotter and drier, increasing the threat of fire. It has been proven that fire-safe landscaping can help save your home.

Now, more than ever, it is important to re-examine your fire danger and how you can help protect your family and property. This advice can help protect your property during fire season and help you prepare for predicted water shortages and climate change.

Create a defensible space
-Remove all dead plants, trees and shrubs. Keep your lawn well mowed and healthy and all plants pruned and well maintained.

-With much drier conditions, increase the recommended defensible space around your home from 30 to 50 feet or as recommended by your local fire department, especially if your area is prone to wildfires. Be sure to include at least 100 to 150 feet around your home in your fire management plan.

-Space trees at least 30 feet apart and prune lower limbs to a height of at least 10 feet.

-Contact your local fire department (or go to www.firesafecouncil.org) for a list of high fuel plants that should be removed.

-Use fire-resistant plants and do not plant in large masses.

-In many areas due to reduced water allocations, it may not be possible to keep a well-watered landscape or to use supplemental irrigation.

-Plant beds should be filled with low flammable plants or decorative rock.

-Make sure water sources needed to fight the fire are working and easy to find. Plastic irrigation lines and parts are flammable and should be installed underground.

-Consider your entrance and exit defensible space.

Related posts:

  1. Mayor’s View: DM and the drought: Water conservation begins with you
  2. Burn Institute offers fire tips
  3. Learn how to protect your home from fire
  4. Don’t hide fire hydrants
  5. Beware: Non-native, invasive plants are fire hazards

Short URL: http://www.delmartimes.net/?p=5541

Posted by on Apr 30, 2009. Filed under Archives. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

Leave a Reply

Archives

Facebook

Bottom Buttons 1

Bottom Buttons 2

Bottom Buttons 3

Bottom Buttons 4

Bottom Buttons 5

Bottom Buttons 6

LA JOLLA NEWS

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

RSS RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

  • Alumni and Advancement Center named for longtime supporters Larry and Cindy Bloch of Rancho Santa Fe
    The University of Rochester’s Alumni and Advancement Center in Rochester, N.Y. has been renamed the Larry and Cindy Bloch Alumni and Advancement Center in recognition of the couple’s support of the university and, in particular, its Advancement programs. In a ceremony on Wednesday, Oct. 15, UR President Joel Seligman formally dedicated the center in honor of […]
  • RSF Association Board Biz: It’s fire season: Be prepared
    The Rancho Santa Fe Fire Protection District (RSFFPD) was officially formed in 1946, in the aftermath of a devastating fire that took place in 1943 and destroyed brush, farmland and homes from Rancho Bernardo through Rancho Santa Fe, all the way to Solana Beach and Del Mar. Today the Fire District spans 38 square miles and protects nearly 30,000 residents. W […]
  • Rancho Santa Fe couple lead way in helping those with thyroid disorders
    Few people may know that Graves’ disease is one of the most common autoimmune diseases afflicting Americans today. Fewer still may know that the only national non-profit dedicated to its patients is headquartered in Rancho Santa Fe. The Graves’ Disease and Thyroid Foundation, co-chaired by Rancho Santa Fe residents Kathleen Bell Flynn and Steve Flynn, has be […]