Research Report: TSRI: Mice successfully created from skin cells

Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) report success in creating live mice from mouse skin cells, without using embryonic stem cells or cloning techniques that require eggs. The study builds on earlier research whereby mature skin cells are reprogrammed to an embryonic-like state.

The TSRI study is part of a trio of studies showing the achievement is possible. Also reporting similar results are two Chinese groups. Each group used different methods with the techniques used by TSRI more effective in producing live pups about 13 percent of the time compared to 3.5 percent or 1 percent reported in the other studies. The research appears online in Nature.

Follow ocean science in
Beginning this week through Aug. 21, follow a research expedition on the high seas and witness (via blog and Twitter) an environmental problem first hand. The destination is the North Pacific Ocean Gyre, located roughly a thousand miles off California’s coast. There, a slowly moving, clockwise spiral of currents has accumulated plastics and other debris into an ocean area estimated to be twice the size of Texas.

Very little is known about this “garbage patch” and what effects the debris might have on the food web. Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UCSD, with support from UC Ship Funds and Project Kaisei, is undertaking a research mission to explore and analyze the problem. The Scripps Environmental Accumulation of Plastic Expedition (SEAPLEX) will conduct surveys of plastic distribution, investigate floating plastic, and assess sea life impacts.

Daily SEAPLEX blogs at http://sio.ucsd.edu/Expeditions/Seaplex/. Follow the expedition on Twitter: @Scripps_Ocean and @Seaplexscience.

Clouds and global warming
As the earth warms under increasing greenhouse gases, will clouds dissipate – letting in more of the sun’s heat energy and making the earth warm? Or, will cloud cover increase – blocking the sun’s rays and actually slowing down global warming? Researchers from the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UCSD believe they have an answer.

The scientists applied complex climate models to two data sets that employed fundamentally different measurement methods: One set consisted of visual observations from ships over the last 50 years; the other was based on data from weather satellites.

The results of the analysis was a surprising degree of agreement between the data sets and revealed that low-level stratiform clouds appear to dissipate as the ocean warms. This indicates that changes in these clouds may enhance the warming of the planet. The study appears in the journal Science.

Related posts:

  1. Scripps reports breakthrough in creating live mice from skin cells
  2. Research Report: Whales resume ancient migration patterns
  3. Google Earth making waves with extension
  4. Research Report: Molecular defect affects hearing
  5. Research Report: Trial tests stem cell treatment for heart failure

Short URL: http://www.delmartimes.net/?p=6134

Posted by marylajolla on Aug 6, 2009. Filed under Archives. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

Leave a Reply

Archives

Facebook

Bottom Buttons 1

Bottom Buttons 2

Bottom Buttons 3

Bottom Buttons 4

Bottom Buttons 5

Bottom Buttons 6

LA JOLLA NEWS

RSS LA JOLLA NEWS

  • FRONTLINE CANCER: Exercise, exercise, exercise!
    Regular exercise improves health in ways most of us already know. It helps control weight, maintain strong bones, muscles and joints, reduce the risk of heart disease, diabetes and premature death. Exercise quite literally makes us feel better, physically and mentally. […]
  • Hunger Games in the Real World
    At age 6, Nya, a girl living in San Diego, was suffering from malnourishment because her father, a single parent was struggling to raise (and feed) his children on an $11-an-hour job. For long periods of time their cupboards were bare, and Nya, who is now 18, subsisted on a diet of ramen noodles and free lunches provided by her charter school. She was in cri […]
  • Fall brings the call to learn something new
    Local gems like UCSD Extension, Osher Lifelong Learning, La Jolla Community Center and La Jolla Library all offer a variety of opportunities for personal growth — and all welcome newcomers. […]

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

RSS RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS