Solana Beach takes steps to reduce carbon footprint

In an effort to offset its greenhouse gas emissions, the city of Solana Beach is teaming with Del Mar-based Nature and Culture International to promote a program to neutralize the city’s carbon footprint.

In the coming weeks, a link on the Solana Beach Web site will go to a “carbon footprint calculator,” where residents and businesses can figure out how much they contribute to environmental degradation. Participants can then elect to offset their emissions by buying acreage, at a tax-deductible $50 per acre, in an Ecuadorian preserve.

The goal for the project is to raise $100,000, enough money to buy 4 square miles — equivalent to the size of Solana Beach.

“The real opportunity is right now, because if we hustle on this, it’s possible by the end of the year we could have a substantial portion reserved by the city of Solana Beach,” said NCI Chairman Ivan Gayler, who founded the organization in 1997.

Gayler said the amount of carbon saved by buying 1 acre is equivalent to the rate of destruction. Further, he said, each American is responsible for about 30 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions per year, while an acre offsets 32 tons. Scientific data links carbon dioxide to global warming, climate change and ozone deterioration.

“An acre comes with the possibility of 60 to 70 to 80 tree species, hundreds of different bird species, thousands of insect species, dozens of ant species in one tree, and a high number of reptile species,” Gayler said.

Left unsold, farmers in the Ecuadorian forest often cut down trees and sell their wood cheaply to timber companies. Also, much of the area has been converted to corn crops, used to create ethanol for biofuels. The areas are preserved and protected by private local and volunteer guards once the property is bought by NCI.

No public money will be contributed to the program, as the agreement was merely to encourage Solana Beach residents and businesses to participate. A carbon footprint for most private individuals will be offset by a $50 purchase, but Councilwoman Lesa Heebner said she hopes Solana Beach residents will take the time to figure out their own.

“It’s the first of its kind, and we’re very pleased with the innovation of this,” she said. “It gives community members, residents and business members a way to do even more than they already have done in their own lives and practices.”

To figure out your carbon footprint, go to www.natureandculture.org/livingforest/calculator1.php.

Related posts:

  1. Greener Dawn goes carbon neutral; Company releases analysis
  2. Solana Beach votes to protect Ecuadorian tropical forest
  3. Solana Beach Sun Rack Locations
  4. Community Leader’s View: Solana Beach reconsiders plan for spending, saving
  5. Solana Beach residents asked to help choose lighting

Short URL: http://www.delmartimes.net/?p=6907

Posted by on Nov 12, 2009. Filed under Archives. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

Leave a Reply

Archives

Facebook

Bottom Buttons 1

Bottom Buttons 2

Bottom Buttons 3

Bottom Buttons 4

Bottom Buttons 5

Bottom Buttons 6

LA JOLLA NEWS

RSS LA JOLLA NEWS

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

RSS RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

  • Rancho Santa Fe resident’s Gen 7 wines earn top honors
    Rancho Santa Fe resident Tim Bacino’s Gen 7 Wines is on a hot streak, his varietals winning several awards this summer in California wine competitions. […]
  • Torrey Pines High School baseball alum Taylor Murphy excelling in pro ball
    It was during a breakout senior year at Torrey Pines High that Taylor Murphy first popped up on the radar of professional scouts. Shortly after graduation, Murphy was selected by the San Diego Padres in the 40th round of the June 2011 amateur draft. He declined, honoring a commitment to the University of the Pacific. Three years later, Murphy got another sho […]
  • Why Hire a Licensed Landscape Professional?
    By Steve Jacobs, Nature Designs The old saying – “if something seems to good to be true, it probable is” – is quite fitting when it comes to hiring a contractor for your home or yard construction project. While it is smart to shop around, get quotes, etc., don’t fall into the trap of trusting […]