Commission says San Diego can continue to pump sewage into ocean

The California Coastal Commission has agreed to allow San Diego to continue to pump 50 billion of gallons of partly-treated sewage deep into the Pacific Ocean each year, five miles off Point Loma, a decision San Diego Mayor Jerry Sanders’ office called a victory for the city, it was reported Saturday.

Acting Friday in Santa Cruz, the Coastal Commission voted to allow San Diego to avoid any of the recommendations made by a $2 million study of wastewater recycling options, the newspaper reported Saturday.

The commission’s decision was a “victory for all San Diegans,” mayor’s spokesman Alex Roth told the San Diego Union-Tribune Friday.

Bruce Reznik, director of San Diego Coastkeeper, told the newspaper the city has promised to investigate recyclibng wastewater from the plant before it makes any commitments. He praised the city for pressing ahead with the study despite the uncertainty about the commission’s permit.

“I do think there is a level of accountability in just making sure they come back to the Coastal Commission,” Reznik said. “At that point, it’s up to groups like Coastkeeper and Surfrider to hold the city’s feet to the fire.”

The Coastal Commission removed language from San Diego’s coastal permits that suggested pumping more than 50 billion gallons a year of partly-treated sewage into the ocean could be causing environmental problems.

The study had examined adding expensive secondary sewage treatment to remove water from the sewage, and use it for landscaping at parks and golf courses. San Diego is the only major California city that is not required to use secondary treatment, and numerous coastal cities use expensive tertiary treatment to extract and recycle irrigation water from some of its sewer plants.

The facility processes sewage from more than 2.2 million people in and around the city and sends solids into the ocean. San Diego has used waivers from federal water and state coastal laws that require secondary sewage treatment, saying the $1.5 billion cost would bring few environmental benefits.

For decades, San Diego has argued that the deepwater sewage outfall and coastal currents off Point Loma allow the ocean there to absorb partially-treated sewage. Many biologists consider the solid human waste to substantially dissipate, and the organic material to be an important source of nutrition for animals low in the ocean food chain.

“It’s a very technical but very important issue,” Roth said. “We can’t get locked into agreeing to something when we don’t know what the conclusion is going to be. That would be irresponsible.”

The city is operating its Point Loma Wastewater Treatment Plant under a waiver from the U.S. Clean Water Act granted by the Coastal Commission in October. It is the city’s third waiver from meeting federal standards for “secondary” treatment of sewage.

Sanders agreed to the earlier study to explore how to use more wastewater for irrigation and other purposes instead of dumping it in the ocean. When terms of the permit waiver were drawn up, based on the commission’s October vote, city lawyers feared the wording would force San Diego to comply with recommendations from a study still underway. The study is expected to be completed in 2012.

The permit was altered Friday to remove requirements that the city reduce the volume of sewage not fully treated before discharge. Left in place were requirements that the city continue to investigate wastewater reclamation and recycling.

Related posts:

  1. Environmental groups agree not to sue
  2. Letters to the Editor: Aug. 28, 2009
  3. Sewage spill at Adobe Falls
  4. City of San Diego launches sewer study
  5. Commission denies request to revoke permit for desal plant

Short URL: http://www.delmartimes.net/?p=2677

Posted by on Mar 15, 2010. Filed under Archives. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

Leave a Reply

Archives

Facebook

Bottom Buttons 1

Bottom Buttons 2

Bottom Buttons 3

Bottom Buttons 4

Bottom Buttons 5

Bottom Buttons 6

LA JOLLA NEWS

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

RSS RANCHO SANTA FE NEWS

  • Alumni and Advancement Center named for longtime supporters Larry and Cindy Bloch of Rancho Santa Fe
    The University of Rochester’s Alumni and Advancement Center in Rochester, N.Y. has been renamed the Larry and Cindy Bloch Alumni and Advancement Center in recognition of the couple’s support of the university and, in particular, its Advancement programs. In a ceremony on Wednesday, Oct. 15, UR President Joel Seligman formally dedicated the center in honor of […]
  • RSF Association Board Biz: It’s fire season: Be prepared
    The Rancho Santa Fe Fire Protection District (RSFFPD) was officially formed in 1946, in the aftermath of a devastating fire that took place in 1943 and destroyed brush, farmland and homes from Rancho Bernardo through Rancho Santa Fe, all the way to Solana Beach and Del Mar. Today the Fire District spans 38 square miles and protects nearly 30,000 residents. W […]
  • Rancho Santa Fe couple lead way in helping those with thyroid disorders
    Few people may know that Graves’ disease is one of the most common autoimmune diseases afflicting Americans today. Fewer still may know that the only national non-profit dedicated to its patients is headquartered in Rancho Santa Fe. The Graves’ Disease and Thyroid Foundation, co-chaired by Rancho Santa Fe residents Kathleen Bell Flynn and Steve Flynn, has be […]