One Paseo: An unmitigated disaster for Carmel Valley

The truth is out.  The voluminous Draft Environmental Impact Report has been released by the City of San Diego Development Services Department.  Contrary to what Kilroy’s slick PR campaign continues to portray, the impacts of this proposed project are severe and would forever change our life in Carmel Valley.

First of all, there is the issue of massive traffic impacts.  The traffic study in the DEIR estimates the project would generate 26,961 net new trips per day.  This is even more than what those of us concerned about the project had calculated. Additionally, there would be installation of two new traffic lights on Del Mar Heights Road between High Bluff and El Camino Real.  All of this would result in a permanent queuing up of cars coming and going to the freeway.

The DEIR states in its executive summary that “the proposed project would result in significant direct and/or cumulative impacts to transportation/circulation/parking, visual effects and neighborhood character, noise, paleontological resources, biological resources, health and safety, and historical resources.” Furthermore, it states that the significant impacts to transportation/circulation/parking and visual effects and neighborhood character cannot be reduced by the proposed mitigation measures.”

So there you have it.  The proposed project is too big, too dense, too out of character with the neighborhood character we love, and generates far too much traffic.  With its high rise buildings, regional-draw shopping center and 150-room hotel, it would forever change the character and quality of life of Carmel Valley.  It would force an urban density, greater than in Los Angeles style mixed-use projects, into our midst ensnaring us in permanent traffic gridlock.  Carmel Valley residents need to demand the design of an alternative lower impact project consistent with the safeguards the Carmel Valley community plan provides to them.  I encourage you to attend the Carmel Valley Planning Board meeting on April 26 at 7 p.m. in the Carmel Valley Library, and to contact your city council member Sherri Lightner, sherrilightner@sandiego.gov, 858-484-3808, to protect your interests and our community.

Gabriele M. Prater
Carmel Valley resident and past Vice Chair Carmel Valley Community Planning Board

Related posts:

  1. Carmel Valley One Paseo draft EIR comment deadline extended to May 29
  2. Kilroy has been responsible; One Paseo will be wonderful
  3. Del Mar council hears opinions on One Paseo project
  4. Planning for new Carmel Valley shopping center creates a buzz
  5. Letters to the Editor: Ten former CV planning board members oppose One Paseo

Short URL: http://www.delmartimes.net/?p=34350

Posted by Staff on Apr 26, 2012. Filed under Letters, Opinion. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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