Encinitas Advocate News

Encinitas election results show Mayor Blakespear with significant lead

Below are unofficial results, with all precincts reporting but without mail-in ballots, for Encinitas races from the Nov. 6 election as of presstime for this newspaper.

Unofficial returns at presstime show Encinitas may have one new council member and two returning incumbents.

The council race is the city's first with district elections. The mayor’s seat remains at-large.

Races are also being held for Measure U, the city's latest attempt at a housing element, the Encinitas Union School District and the San Dieguito Union High School District.

Mayor

Catherine Blakespear
Catherine Blakespear Courtesy

Catherine Blakespear has been re-elected as Encinitas' mayor, earning a significant lead against challenger John Paul Elliott, according to unofficial results at presstime.

With all precincts reporting, Blakespear earned 82.88 percent of votes, compared to Elliott, who earned 16.21 percent.

The incumbent mayor, a practicing lawyer and 19-year resident who also grew up in the city, was first elected to the Encinitas City Council in 2014 and began serving her first two-year term as mayor in January 2017.

During her campaign, she has prioritized helping the city pass a state-certified housing plan, easing traffic congestion and continuing the city's “Gold Standard Climate Action Plan.”

“I’m so grateful to see this strong initial support from the community,” Blakespear said about an hour after the polls closed. “It’s nice to know that Encinitas voters feel the city is in a good place and that we’re on the right track. I’m very much looking forward to continuing our good work over the next two years.”

Elliott, a 40-year real estate broker, moved to the Leucadia community of Encinitas in July and ran his platform on finding solutions for true affordable housing. He was also vocal against the Leucadia Streetscape project.

Jody Hubbard
Jody Hubbard Courtesy

District 3 (Cardiff)

Jody Hubbard has won against incumbent Mark Muir, who has served two terms on the council, according to unofficial results at presstime.

Hubbard earned 52.96 percent of votes, compared to Muir, who earned 46.83 percent.

Hubbard, an Encinitas Planning Commissioner and 19-year resident, has said the city needs to do more about traffic calming and prioritizing affordable housing.

“We worked really hard on our campaign and I am cautiously optimistic that we will win,” she said about two hours after the polls closed. “I had a positive message that resonated with the residents.”

Muir, a retired fire chief and 40-year Encinitas resident, has said creating a traffic circulation element that makes the city safer for all and preserving open space were among his top priorities.

District 4 (Olivenhain and New Encinitas)

Joe Mosca
Joe Mosca Courtesy

Joe Mosca has been elected to his first term, following his 2017 appointment to the council, according to unofficial results at presstime.

The incumbent led with 50.89 percent against challenger Tony Brandenburg, who earned 48.76 percent.

Mosca, a four-year resident and manager at San Diego Gas & Electric, has said his key areas of focus while on the council will be maintaining a fiscally-sound budget, prioritizing public safety and increasing citywide mobility while maintaining the safety of roads.

Brandenburg, who also unsuccessfully ran in the 2016 election, has said he wants to balance the city council, create a true affordable housing plan, and have the city make modest progress without sacrificing community character or small businesses.

76th Assembly District

Encinitas Council member Tasha Boerner Horvath appears to be heading to a higher office as she leads against competitor Elizabeth Warren for a seat on the state's 76th Assembly District, according to unofficial results.

Boerner Horvath earned 55.48 percent of votes, compared to Warren, who earned 44.52 percent. Both candidates are Democrats. The district has been solidly Republican for years but incumbent Rocky Chavez decided not to seek reelection this year, instead opting to seek U.S. Rep. Darrell Issa’s seat.

The 76th, which includes Oceanside, Vista, Camp Pendleton, Carlsbad and Encinitas, hosted a full-bore competition even though both candidates agreed at the outset to forego their party’s nomination.

Because Boerner Horvath's four-year term isn't up for re-election until November 2020, if she is certified as the winner of the assembly race, the council would have to fill her vacancy by appointment or by holding a special election, said City Clerk Kathy Hollywood. If the council decides to appoint a new member, it would decide whether to select someone from Boerner Horvath's district or from the city at-large. If the council decides to hold a special election, anyone from Encinitas could run for the position, Hollywood said.

Boerner Horvath was first elected to the Encinitas City Council in 2016. During her campaign for the assembly seat, the former planning commissioner focused on environmental issues and on the fact that she had previous experience as an elected official.

“I am humbled by the support our campaign earned last night, from voters of all political parties and in every corner of the 76th Assembly District,” she said Nov. 7. “I am looking forward to serving as the responsive and effective advocate that North County residents deserve to have in the State Assembly. I would also like to congratulate and thank Liz Warren for the campaign she ran and the ideas she worked to advance.”

Warren, a community activist from Oceanside, focused on Medicare for all, and on free health college education, issues that played well with her base in the primary election and which inspired a large number of younger volunteers to get out and knock on doors.

Measure U

Encinitas is sending its housing plan back to the drawing board after results indicate residents are against Measure U, the city's latest attempt at a plan for zoning for future housing.

52.91 percent of voters disapproved of the plan, with 47.09 percent for it, according to unofficial results at presstime.

The plan zones 15 sites, with 1,504 units, across Encinitas' five communities for possible future housing.

The council initially approved the plan in August, with Council member Tasha Boerner Horvath dissenting. Because of the city's Prop A which residents passed in 2013 to allow more transparency on future zoning the fate of the plan had to be ultimately decided by voters.

Encinitas Union School District

Unofficial results show incumbents Marla Strich (25.75 percent), Emily Andrade (24.53 percent) and Gregg M. Sonken (21.46 percent) as front-runners for three seats on the Encinitas Union School District Board of Trustees.

Other candidates in the race include Christian S. Adams and Amy C. Glancy.

San Dieguito Union High School District

In the district’s first by-area election, unofficial results show Maureen “Mo” Muir (52.08 percent) in Area 1, Melisse C. Mossy (52.10 percent) in Area 3 and Kristin Gibson (42.55 percent) in Area 5 as the front-runners for the three available seats on the San Dieguito Union High School District board.

Candidates in the running for Area 1 representing Encinitas were Amy Flicker, and Rhea A. Stewart in Area 3 representing Solana Beach, Cardiff, Rancho Santa Fe and Encinitas. Cheryl James-Ward and Lea Wolf also sought the seat for Area 5, which represents the south part of the district in Carmel Valley and Pacific Highlands Ranch.

— San Diego Union-Tribune Community Press reporter Karen Billing and San Diego Union-Tribune reporter Paul Sisson contributed to this report.

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