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Local designer’s Keep the Peace Bedding helps couples rest easier

An example of a custom quilt, structured with two different styles. Courtesy photo
An example of a custom quilt, structured with two different styles. Courtesy photo

Local interior designer Renae Farley has created a new product that helps couples sleep better together and stop fighting over the blanket. Understanding that not many pairs sleep at the same temperature, she created Keep the Peace Bedding, which uses a unique zipper to split comforters that individualize warmth for a better night’s rest.

A San Diego native, Farley has lived and worked in North County for 30 years and launched Keep the Peace six weeks ago after years of enjoying her own customizable comforter with her husband.

Local interior designer Renae Farley created Keep the Peace Bedding. Courtesy photo
Local interior designer Renae Farley created Keep the Peace Bedding. Courtesy photo

“It’s just been great; everybody’s just loved it,” Farley said. “It’s been fun to finally get it out there and see what people think about it.”

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Farley has been interested in design since she was 12 years old. Her father built the family’s house, and she helped her mother decorate and make it a home. A certified interior designer, she has her BFA in interior design from the Design Institute of San Diego and has spent the past 30 years doing high-end residential design, mainly with clients in Rancho Santa Fe.

The idea for Keep the Peace started after she was married seven years ago and experienced the struggle many couples face at night.

“I had always slept under a down comforter because I’m always freezing, and all my husband needed was a sheet or light blanket,” Farley said.

When he would be “roasting” under the comforter, he would throw it off and onto Farley. Then she would be too warm because she had double the comforter on top of her. Lots of tossing and turning ensued.

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“For four months, neither one of us was sleeping,” Farley said.

Since she had always done custom bedding for her interior design clients, she cut her comforter in half and connected a down comforter and a lightweight cotton blanket with a zipper. The marriage-saving solution seemed to be the greatest invention ever.

Farley’s husband looked into getting a patent for the bed covering, but it was not patentable. So they just used it themselves, with him all the while pushing her to get it on the market.

Over the past year, Farley decided to go for it and set off on a long process of finding just the right products and materials to bring Keep the Peace to a larger market.

The bedding comes in full, queen, Eastern king and California king sizes, and in four different products: cotton, bamboo, down and synthetic down, because Farley realized many people are allergic to down.

The zipper makes it possible to fold back or completely remove one side of the comforter without affecting the person on the other side.

“I created Keep the Peace bedding as a blank canvas,” Farley said. “It’s designed to be used under a decorative coverlet or quilt so couples can still make their sleeping haven their own.”

Two years ago, Farley battled breast cancer and dealt with medications that brought on complications such as night sweats. The zippered bedding came in handy for dealing with her temperature changes. She realized that was a whole other market to be reached by Keep the Peace bedding, as many people experience sleep-related discomforts associated with life states such as menopause and aging, and health issues such as allergies, pregnancy, and cancer.

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“Our health is everything to us, and sleeping is one of the most important aspects about our health,” Farley said.

For October, she contributed a portion of her sales toward breast cancer.

Moving forward, Farley said she would love to see her product used in the hotel industry so couples can continue to have a good night’s sleep while traveling.

Besides design, Farley has many other passions and keeps very busy. She is an advocate for the breast cancer cause and she has also become an advocate for early-onset Alzheimer’s, the disease that took the life of her dear friend and sister, Diane, after she was diagnosed at 49.

One in 8 women will get breast cancer, she said, but 1 in 6 will get early-onset Alzheimer’s. Farley has done speaking engagements on the subject and wrote a book in her sister’s memory called “All We Need Is a Happy Ending.”

Visit Keepthepeacebedding.com.


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