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Summer storm a surprise addition to Del Mar district’s summer maintenance work

New flooring in Carmel Del Mar’s front entryway became part of the post-rainstorm cleanup. Photo by Karen Billing

Del Mar Union School District’s Mike Galis, director of maintenance, operations and facilities, was asked to “work miracles” this summer.

In addition to a summer’s worth of scheduled school campus improvements, Galis and his staff had to deal with a surprise of heavy rains in July just as roof work was being done at Carmel Del Mar. While the team did its best to prep before the storm, the flood damage at the school was significant.

“It was just one big mess,” Galis said.

What followed was a mad rush to get the school back into shape for the first day of school.

A disaster restoration company was brought in, and all of the classrooms’ contents had to be packed up and moved to the multi-use room for storage while carpets were ripped out and replaced with new flooring, damaged walls and ceilings were redone and the rooms were completely cleaned. The crew filled four 40-yard Dumpsters with damaged materials.

In addition to the storm recovery efforts, Carmel Del Mar was in the process of partial modernization, which included the new roof, skylights, heating, ventilation and air conditioning system, and new modern learning studios.

Several district campuses saw improvement projects over the summer.

At Ashley Falls, crews spruced up the Early Childhood Development Center and after school program facility, installing a new sign and mural, new furniture and carpet.

The play structures were redone at Del Mar Heights, and new flooring was installed in the administration area at Del Mar Hills as well as new tables and benches in the lunch area. Sycamore Ridge also got modern learning studios and as work continues on the new Early Childhood Development Center at Torrey Hills, the campus also got a new play area and parking lot.

All school campuses had bulbs replaced with LED bulbs with help from the California Conservation Corps. Galis said the new bulbs will result in energy savings of $40,000 to $50,000 a year and will last 50,000 hours per lamp versus 20,000 hours.


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